NOAA, USGS: Climate change impacts to U.S. coasts threaten public health, safety and economy

NOAA, USGS: Climate change impacts to U.S. coasts threaten public health, safety and economy.

From NOAA:

A key finding in the report is that all U.S. coasts are highly vulnerable to the effects of climate change such as sea-level rise, erosion, storms and flooding, especially in the more populated low-lying parts of the U.S. coast along the Gulf of Mexico, Mid-Atlantic, northern Alaska, Hawaii, and island territories. Another finding indicated the financial risks associated with both private and public hazard insurance are expected to increase dramatically.

“An increase in the intensity of extreme weather events such as storms like Sandy and Katrina, coupled with sea-level rise and the effects of increased human development along the coasts, could affect the sustainability of many existing coastal communities and natural resources,” said Virginia Burkett of the U.S. Geological Survey and co-lead author of the report.

Natural "green barriers."Natural “green barriers” help protect this Florida coastline and infrastructure from severe storms and floods.Download Image. (Credit: NOAA)

The authors also emphasized that storm surge flooding and sea-level rise pose significant threats to public and private infrastructure that provides energy, sewage treatment, clean water and transportation of people and goods. These factors increase threats to public health, safety, and employment in the coastal zone.

More at:

http://www.noaanews.noaa.gov/stories2013/20130125_coastalclimateimpacts.html

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